Children

Researchers in the United States have conducted a study showing that the antibody response to vaccination designed to protect against coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) wanes substantially over time among patients receiving maintenance dialysis. The team’s study of more than 1,500 individuals found that antibody titers against the COVID-19 causative agent – severe acute respiratory syndrome
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Allergic reactions to the new mRNA-based COVID-19 vaccines are rare, typically mild and treatable, and they should not deter people from becoming vaccinated, according to research from the Stanford University School of Medicine. The findings will be published online Sept. 17 in JAMA Network Open. We wanted to understand the spectrum of allergies to the
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Six stages of engagement in treatment of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) have been reported by researchers at Boston Medical Center based on a diverse study, inclusive of parents of predominantly racial and ethnic minority children with ADHD. Published in Pediatrics, this new framework has been informed by the experiences of parents throughout the various stages that
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The initial period of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic did not seriously affect children partly due to their relative isolation from sources of infection via school closures. However, the delta variant of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) that is currently spreading has affected children more than that initial period. Study: The
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Researchers in the United States have warned that as of July 15th this year (2021), the level of population immunity against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) – the agent that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) – may still have been insufficient to contain infection outbreaks and safely return to pre-pandemic social behavior. As
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In December 2020, two novel messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccines for SARS-CoV-2 received emergency use authorization from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration; however, the early trials excluded lactating women, leading to questions about their safety in this specific population. In a recent study, published in the online edition of Breastfeeding Medicine, researchers at University of
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More than 70 percent of breastfeeding women take some form of medication, but 90 percent of those medications are not appropriately labeled for pregnant or lactating women. This means the drugs are taken “off-label” or without Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval, largely because they have never been tested in this population. Even less is
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A new study by UT Southwestern scientists indicates that an enzyme called protein phosphatase 2 (PP2A) appears to be a major driver of preeclampsia, a dangerous pregnancy complication characterized by the development of high blood pressure and excess protein in the urine. The finding, published in Circulation Research, could lead to new treatments for preeclampsia
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COVID-19 vaccination results in minimal disruption of lactation. Vaccination also has no adverse impact on the breastfed child, according to two studies published in the peer-reviewed journal Breastfeeding Medicine. Skyler McLaurin-Jiang, MD, MPH, and coauthors from Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, School of Medicine, surveyed 4,455 breastfeeding mothers who underwent COVIC-19 vaccination. They reported
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About a quarter of the world’s population is infected with tuberculosis bacteria, according to the World Health Organization, but only about 5 to 10% of those infected will develop symptoms. These pathogens are mycobacteria, which are everywhere, including in chlorine-treated tap water. Most people who encounter mycobacteria will never even know, but, for a few
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The increased infectiousness and faster transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome 2 (SARS-CoV-2) variants, along with the resistance towards masking and vaccinations, have made it difficult to predict the trajectory of the pandemic. In the United States, the Delta variant disrupted the low number of cases observed in the summer and caused a higher surge
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Licensing productive transcription through RNA polymerase II stabilityPlay Video Credit: Northwestern University Northwestern Medicine scientists have identified a critical checkpoint in transcription elongation, the process of synthesizing RNA from a DNA template, according to findings published in Molecular Cell. According to the study, the presence of a protein called SPT5 serves as a “passport,” determining
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The four Chief Medical Officers will provide further advice on the COVID-19 vaccination of young people aged 12 to 15 with COVID-19 vaccines following the advice of the independent Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI). The independent medicines regulator, the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA), has approved the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines
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From tele-monitoring patients with diabetes to using artificial intelligence to prevent sepsis, the newly launched Center for Health Innovation at UC San Diego Health will seek to develop, test and commercialize technologies that make a real, measurable difference in the lives and wellbeing of patients. Every U.S. hospital has common challenges to address in continuously
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A new study by researchers at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University finds that cancer-associated mutations originate in blood progenitor cells, leading to distinct changes in both cancer and non-cancer immune cells in Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia (WM), a type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and its precursor IgM monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). The study by Madhav.
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David Sela, a nutrition scientist at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, has received a five-year, $1.69 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to investigate how nitrogen in human milk is used by beneficial microbes in the infant gut to potentially play an important role in pediatric nutrition and development. The new experiments,
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Since the COVID-19 pandemic reached the United States in early 2020, scientists have struggled to find laboratory models of SARS-CoV-2 infection, the respiratory virus that causes COVID-19. Animal models fell short; attempts to grow adult human lungs have historically failed because not all of the cell types survived. Undaunted, stem cell scientists, cell biologists, infectious
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A deep look into a nationwide mass vaccination setting in Israel revealed that the BNT162b2 (Pfizer–BioNTech) vaccine is not linked with an elevated risk of a majority of the adverse events under study, with the exception of myocarditis. However, even that potentially severe adverse event is much more pervasive following the infection with severe acute
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Researchers with the Vanderbilt Diabetes Research and Training Center (DRTC) at Vanderbilt University Medical Center led a multisite study which has demonstrated that, when controlled and standardized, quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the pancreas is highly reproducible when using different MRI hardware and software at different geographic locations. This finding opens up a new
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Researchers from the HSE Centre for Language and Brain and their Russian and American colleagues have become the first to compare expressive and receptive language abilities of Russian children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) at different linguistic levels. Their work helped them refute the hypothesis that children with ASD understand spoken language less well than
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The breast milk of lactating mothers vaccinated against COVID-19 contains a significant supply of antibodies that may help protect nursing infants from the illness, according to new research from the University of Florida. Our findings show that vaccination results in a significant increase in antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 -; the virus that causes COVID-19 -; in
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